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“The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby Martin Shaw » Sat Jul 06, 2019 9:36 pm

good luck with the fundraising
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby The92ForAutism » Sat Jul 06, 2019 9:40 pm

Martin Shaw wrote:good luck with the fundraising


Thanks Martin, I had a big speech prepared but the forum doesn’t allow me to post it ..

Basically Anne Matthews & Mansfield have donated to me a Stags Voucher for me to raffle off for a Stags fan to win 2 match day tickets.

If fans want to enter then that’s great as it will raise for money for the 3 organisations.

Follow the steps to enter the competition as mentioned by clicking on my Twitter link above.

Thanks for your support.
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby Martin Shaw » Sat Jul 06, 2019 9:43 pm

The92ForAutism wrote:
Martin Shaw wrote:good luck with the fundraising


Thanks Martin, I had a big speech prepared but the forum doesn’t allow me to post it ..

Basically Anne Matthews & Mansfield have donated to me a Stags Voucher for me to raffle off for a Stags fan to win 2 match day tickets.

If fans want to enter then that’s great as I will raise for money for the 3 organisations.

Follow the steps to enter the competition as mentioned by clicking on my Twitter link above.

Thanks for your support.

I'm not sure what you mean when you say "the forum doesn’t allow me to post it"

All I can think is that a special character in your text that you are copying and pasting might stop it being accepted.
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby The92ForAutism » Sat Jul 06, 2019 9:46 pm

Yes it says I’ve posted some sort of text symbol that wasn’t allowed .. no harm done :)
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby Iliketrains » Mon Jul 08, 2019 12:28 pm




So proud of you mate. The lack of awareness from football clubs about fans with autism is shocking. I say that as a 40 year old with High Functioning Autism (HFA) previously known as Asperger Syndrome, who has been going to games since the late 80's. For those who aren't that aware, an adult with High Functioning Autism has many of the difficulties and challenges that someone with more profound autism will have but it might not be apparent. I don't physically look like i have physical and mental difficulties, i don't speak like that and i don't act like that.

If i went for a beer in the Sandy Pate with any of you i'd just come across as a usual bloke with a family talking about the footy and stuff. It's impossible to tell. I may do something called 'stimming' which is a behaviour like rubbing my fingers together or whatever that acts as a reassuring coping mechanism to deal with stress but nobody will ever notice it as a problem. I am able to work and to fit in and make friends like neurotypical people do but behind the mask there are multiple challenges occuring literally every second that have to be managed and micro managed whilst not only trying to come across as 'normal' but whilst also trying to hide the fact that I have autism. Sensory issues, anxiety, communication etc but because it's how you grew up back then in the 90's and 00's you had to hide it to survive. People judge through fear and ignorance and whilst this is improving there is still a long way to go.

If you think Robert De Niro or Johnny Depp are good actors. They ain't got nowt on me. ;) Dan Ackroyd has HFA. Another great actor in both senses.

Another key problem in HFA is a difference in thinking which affects me greatly. Primarily because a lot of the time i tend to place importance on things that to most other people may see as not important at all. For example in footballing terms, the customer service and help i receive from my football club and the importance i place on being listened to and respected far overrides anything that happens on the pitch. So most fans don't mind how their football club treats them as long as the team is winning. I prefer my team to win but it's not the be all and end all. If my team lost 50 games on the spin i'd still go because it's a duty and a routine. If my team WON 50 games on the spin but i felt let down and received poor service from the club then i would consider stopping going.

It's a lot to get your head round i appreciate but this is an example of how i, and others with autism may place their importance on something that seems minor to others or not appropriate to the situation but to me and the autistic brain it is THE sole matter of importance. Getting relegated 5 years in a row won't affect my attendance at football because it's not of primary importance. That probably makes no sense to anyone now lol! Although it can cause arguments on football forums :lol: .

I no doubt get accused of not being a real fan but they base this on their own view of what should constitute 'a real fan' without understanding others views. They should ask themselves if their club lost every game for 30 years would they still go. I would. If i wasn't happy with the overall treatment from my club though then it wouldn't matter to me if they club didn't lose for 30 years. They ain't getting any of my money until they show some courtesy, respect and apply common sense to a lot of complaints.

I haven't been to Field Mill for a while now as i have been unhappy with the service i have received from the ticket office / club shop and also the frustration in not being able to reserve prior seats in the IG wings that are always inexplicably blocked from booking online. Amongst other unfathomable protocols and logic defying ideas around ticketing etc that the club implement that i find restrictive, unhelpful and in some cases simply unfair.

Some clubs are making a big effort for autistic fans but they aren't always inclusive to all.

For example there are clubs who have sensory rooms for autistic people to watch games in without the stress of the noise and hustle and bustle of being in the stands. However these are geared primarily towards young fans. As in many cases the struggles with autism worsen as we age, a sensory room for adults would be an idea? Also there are fans like myself who would benefit from quieter, restricted sections of seating just for people with autism or for people who aren't going to be sat next to fans they don't know jumping up and shouting every two minutes and creating unpredictability.

Wrexham have a section of their seating area set aside but the rest of the clubs don't seem interested. I am trying to address this issue as we speak. It's not easy however. I have contacted all 92 league clubs at various points for help, advice and to raise awareness and most, including Mansfield didn't see me worthy of reply.

It does frustrate me that for some reason football clubs only seem to think that it is young people who have autism and therefore they target every initiative towards that demographic. I would suspect there are many older fans with autism out there who are managing their matchday experience as best they possibly can but it seems to get more difficult each season as age and the ability to cope with stressful situations and sensory difficulties becomes lessened.

That said though, kids are the future of our football clubs whether they have autism or not and they need a helping hand to make regular attendance possible and enjoyable. The rate of autism amongst children now is rapidly increasing and soon enough most organisations, not just football clubs will need to adapt to this and start providing suitable accessibility strategies or run the risk of discrimination accusations.

Autism for now can be batted off by a lot of clubs citing a 'lack of awareness' but in the very near future they will be held accountable and that excuse won't wash anymore.

Ian, what you are doing is fantastic and hats off to you. I'd considered doing something similar myself recently but i've not been in the best of health and such an undertaking is a mental and physical drain. As well as being a lot of fun too though! Maybe i will do something similar when i regain full fitness.

Best of luck and thankyou for trying to raise awareness of autism. Thanks also to Stagsnet and to most Stags fans for being fair, understanding and open minded about autism. The prevalence in autism in children going forward will ensure that everyone will, at some point know somebody whose lives include somebody who has autism so we need to wise up to it and accept it. Could be your kids or your best mates kids or anyone you know. It's not an illness although i can't deny it's very challenging but it's not going away anytime soon.

I'd hazard a guess that some of you reading this may have mild difficulties that could be related to autism and have some similarities to people at the very high end of the spectrum but won't ever know it or find out. Like i didn't know it for the best part of 35 years but only recently found out.

I will keep up to date with your progress Ian. Enjoy the experience!
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby The92ForAutism » Mon Jul 08, 2019 9:32 pm

Wow .. thank you Iliketrains so much for your support and thank you for that post as it is an insight into how you cope in the everyday world and at football, including your coping strategies.

Can I ask how the autism diagnosis came about? as you mentioned it wasn’t until later in life.

I think there is 5 clubs that I know of that have a sensory room, which out of 92 clubs shows as you mentioned that a lot of clubs are not aware of how to help providing an area of support in their stadiums to assist people on the spectrum.

Sunderland, who I support have one for the last couple of seasons and they have allowed me access for when I visit for my fundraising event which is good of them & it is something that I am going to take advantage of in the future to take my 9 year old autistic son to a game in the sensory room.

Thank you again for your support, I will be posting updates on the donation page plus my Facebook & Twitter :)
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby Martin Shaw » Mon Jul 08, 2019 9:51 pm

The92ForAutism wrote:Wow .. thank you Iliketrains so much for your support and thank you for that post as it is an insight into how you cope in the everyday world and at football, including your coping strategies.

Can I ask how the autism diagnosis came about? as you mentioned it wasn’t until later in life.

I think there is 5 clubs that I know of that have a sensory room, which out of 92 clubs shows as you mentioned that a lot of clubs are not aware of how to help providing an area of support in their stadiums to assist people on the spectrum.

Sunderland, who I support have one for the last couple of seasons and they have allowed me access for when I visit for my fundraising event which is good of them & it is something that I am going to take advantage of in the future to take my 9 year old autistic son to a game in the sensory room.

Thank you again for your support, I will be posting updates on the donation page plus my Facebook & Twitter :)

The92 - there is a sensory room at Mansfield, which was opened in November
https://www.mansfieldtown.net/news/2018 ... mily-room/

If you come to a match at Mansfield, I'm sure you'll be made to feel welcome.
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby HU7stag » Mon Jul 08, 2019 9:58 pm

I believe Notts County have more than one sensory room, however they are non league.
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby Iliketrains » Mon Jul 08, 2019 11:46 pm

The sensory 'area' at Mansfield isn't the same as a sensory 'room'. Sensory rooms are an enclosed, secure, soundproofed space overlooking the pitch that allow a person(s) with autism to watch a live football match. They also will only be for the autistic person(s) and their parents / carers or equivalent. The sensory rooms aren't a free for all which basically what the sensory areas can be like and this puts a lot of autistic youngsters off using them. Because they feel uncomfortable with strangers effectively 'intruding' into their space.

I'd like to hear feedback from anyone with autistic kids who has used the sensory area at Field Mill. IMO in general if a kid with autism has specifically sought out the sensory area for respite and refuge then sharing that space with other kids not known to them is likely to render the sensory room purposeless and they are likely to not want to use the sensory area. Therefore i believe that sensory ROOMS work due to their privacy but i'm not so sure yet about sensory AREAS due to them being general public access and not exclusively used for the autistic individual and the people they feel comfortable with.

Mansfield have a sensory room as do Doncaster Rovers and a few other clubs although i'm unsure how utilized these are and also i am unsure about whether people are finding them of great benefit. That said, the very fact that some clubs are starting to open up these spaces shows that they are at least thinking about improving the matchday experience for autistic people and at the same time raising awareness of autism but as i said in my earlier post, clubs need to do a lot more and a lot more for older fans with autism and not just kids.

Simple accommodations are often all that is needed and not thousands of pounds spent on sensory rooms. Myself for example i always require an end seat inside a ground. In addition i also look for the seat next to me to be unoccupied as i get claustrophobic and just feel weird being sat so close to somebody i don't know. Not only that but because i don't know them i cannot predict their behaviour which adds more stress.

Will they start chatting to me when all i want is to be left in peace to absorb the game? Forcing me to interact and challenge my brain to communicate when all i want to do is switch off for 90 minutes. Will they be someone who shouts random stuff, constantly startling me or will they be someone up and down like a jack in the box pointing, swearing and gesticulating? I've no problem with anybody doing all this but just not around me. I'm at the footy to try and relax and enjoy it and i can't do that when i'm constantly feeling hemmed in and anxious about what anybody next to me will do.

Therefore i need an end seat and it needs to be in a quiet area of the stand. I also generally require the seat to be on the back row. I dislike people behind me. I cannot see them and it makes me edgy.

I also need my tickets to be booked well in advance so i know where i will be sat and i can minimize potential stressors.

Unfortunately MTFC aren't good at facilitating my attendance as they don't allow certain blocks of the IG to be pre booked and therefore with only one other stand available, the chances of getting an end seat at the back are next to none.

Maybe using a section of seats in the IG as a 'quiet area' where anyone who sits in there will be comfortable in the knowledge that those sat around them also want calm and aren't likely to be flipping and jeffing every 2 minutes or acting erratically and unpredictably.

It needn't cost anything and would create a safe space for kids and adults on the spectrum who don't necessarily require a sensory room and who could happily sit in the stands but who still find attending games difficult. Difficult partly because of their challenges but also MADE difficult by the club's ludicrous and restrictive online ticketing system / policy.

Also disabled tickets should be accessible online. Having to ring up the club every time to buy tickets or pop down is madness. It's easier for non disabled fans to purchase than disabled fans. Whilst autism in itself is not necessarily a disability for many, the prospect of unnecessary phone calls etc is more stress and hassle and just puts people off.

So there you have it. All football clubs IMO should provide a small area of seating in a stand as 'quiet zones' and these can be for fans on the spectrum as well as fans who are able to observe the rules and regs of the zone and just want to sit in a calm area surrounded by calmer fans. This allows kids and adults on the spectrum who struggle with matchday to both manage their anxiety / sensory issues whilst at the same time making them part of the crowd and thus feeling part of the crowd and not some isolated figure stuck up in a sensory room.

Sensory rooms are invaluable for fans with more profound difficulties with their autism and are needed yes but for a lot of fans with 'milder' autism, just a bit of consideration, leeway and common sense would help us no end. It needn't cost anything either. Just better planning and organization.

Sunderland have one of the best sensory rooms opened in conjunction with The Shippey Campaign.

Ian, i got diagnosed as i was always struggling with one thing or another but if you have autism there will always have been something deep down niggling you that you ARE different from others in a lot of areas but over time you get adept at hiding that from others to fit in. You can never hide it from yourself though.

I was assessed by Derby NHS over a 3 day period and after a 3 year wait to see a specialist which is a disgrace in itself. Then you get told there is no support because even though you are an adult with autism and although the last 30 odd years of dealing with it and not knowing have all but left you decimated physically and mentally, they see that you have coped and are not deemed needy of support.

Help is available out there if you are a child with autism or if you are at the other end of the spectrum and have more severe difficulties which is fair enough. There is no help for people like me and i will have to crack on with it as best i can as i have done for the most part of life. It gets harder as i age though, as does going to the footy.

Anyway, novel over and i'll keep an eye out! Best wishes! ;)
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby The92ForAutism » Tue Jul 09, 2019 12:29 pm

Thanks .. I’ll be doing my best to raise awareness & hopefully receive some donations along the way :)
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby Dan » Tue Jul 09, 2019 1:02 pm

Notts County have got a proper sensory room, it's one of the executive boxes that they turned into it as it's soundproof & all closed in.
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby Iliketrains » Tue Jul 09, 2019 1:28 pm

Dan wrote:Notts County have got a proper sensory room, it's one of the executive boxes that they turned into it as it's soundproof & all closed in.


Yes Dan. I was invited to try it out but declined. I am far happier with being in the stands, it's just that i require a few little tweaks here and there to enable me to enjoy a match with the minimum of stress to the same degree as someone attending the match who doesn't have autism. I believe the head groundsman at County had a daughter with autism and he was instrumental in implementing the sensory room at Meadow Lane which is fantastic.

What i have found bizarre is that it's generally the lower / non league clubs who have limited income, resources and space who are at least trying to make inroads here whilst most of the clubs in the Championship and the Premier League with all the cash don't seem to want to get their arses in gear and deal with this. Yes they have autism awareness days and collecting for autism charities at matches but does that address the problem outside of that particular matchday? No. It's out of sight out of mind afterwards for the majority of clubs and change needs to happen and happen quick if they are to adhere to the equality act 2010. They are already nearly a decade overdue.

As stated. The sensory room at Mansfield, whilst a step in the right direction still doesn't satisfy the duties and responsibilities to people of all ages with autism and it doesn't fulfill the criteria required in order to comply fully with the Equality Act 2010 for autistic football fans.
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby Dan » Tue Jul 09, 2019 1:39 pm

I think it's down to ignorance mate. A lot of clubs are either oblivious to it or ignorant to it (or both). Like you say it was Trev who helped get the sensory room at Meadow Lane. Man Utd ripped a load of seats out to be able to accommodate more wheelchair dependent fans a couple of season ago which you can see a lot of behind the goal in the East Stand on tv footage. Not many clubs have many disabled spaces as all the new grounds don't seem to bother thinking about them so it's good to see United doing it. Now they need to start thinking about sensory rooms. However I've got a feeling they will say that with 50/60/70,000 fans attending the games, having sensory rooms will be a waste of time as there will be crowds everywhere anyway. All about educating themselves to the needs etc.
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby HU7stag » Tue Jul 09, 2019 1:43 pm

Iliketrains wrote:
As stated. The sensory room at Mansfield, whilst a step in the right direction still doesn't satisfy the duties and responsibilities to people of all ages with autism and it doesn't fulfill the criteria required in order to comply fully with the Equality Act 2010 for autistic football fans.


Not having a go at you, however please can you clarify this. Are you saying we aren't complying with the Equality Act 2010 by not having an appropriate sensory room? If so, and as mentioned above by Ian, there aren't many football clubs with sensory rooms, so that's a lot of clubs breaking the Equality Act.

Incidentally, best of luck to Ian and his colleagues.
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby Iliketrains » Tue Jul 09, 2019 7:56 pm

HU7stag i will try and clarify a best i can. I appreciate it's a lot to take in. It certainly is for me and i've been learning about this stuff for ages! :D

Clubs aren't necessarily contravening the equality act by not having sensory rooms so apologies if i gave that impression. Clubs do however run the risk of being in breach and potentially taken to court by an individual(s) if they don't believe that adequate provision is being made for them because of their autism, or indeed any other 'condition' included in that act.

As for the nuts and bolts of any said provision, i'd imagine it could be quite ambiguous and variable due to autism being on a 'spectrum' and thus something that one person with autism requires due to difficulties may not be required of another person with autism. However, each persons individual requirements must be reasonably accommodated by the football club.

For example. If i require the seat next to me to be empty due to the stress caused by having to sit directly next to a stranger then clubs should accommodate this at no extra charge and basically allow me to book 2 seats for the price of 1. Currently if you are disabled and in receipt of benefits like Personal Independence Payment then all clubs allow you to purchase a seat and then get the seat next to you free. Usually this is for a carer that can accompany the disabled person however this also still allows the disabled person to have 2 seats for the price of 1 even if the carer isn't present.

For people with autism who also require this same level of accommodation of that afforded to disabled people, it becomes instantly more problematic because autism isn't necessarily classed as a blanket disability in itself and thus those of us at the higher functioning end of the spectrum usually fall between two stools in the fact that we aren't deemed severe enough to be awarded PIP in order to obtain the free carers / empty seat yet our challenges are severe enough to stop us doing what we want to do and going where we want to go. That includes football matches.

Because a lot of people with autism don't have any obvious disabilities then they are discriminated against because they have hidden disabilities. Their difficulties cannot be seen.

My argument is that each person with an autism diagnosis should be treated the same as somebody who is registered disabled in terms of the Equality Act 2010 therefore if somebody ISN'T in receipt of PIP but has an NHS autism diagnosis (which isn't easy to get by the way - especially as an adult) then they should still be allowed a free seat if they pay for 1. Either for accompaniment from a friend or someone they know and are comfortable with or for the seat to be empty so they don't have to sit next to a stranger.

There are a lot of clubs who use their discretion and do stipulate that they are more than willing to discuss the allowing of free carer tickets even if you don't get disability benefit which is commendable but IMO they ALL should be doing it as a matter of protocol to comply with the Equality Act as that act states people with autism should have the same rights as disabled people. So in that respect HU7stag you are spot on. The majority of football clubs are contravening the Equality Act IMO.

If a disabled person gets a free ticket for a carer then so should a person with autism as one is not 'more worthy' than another which is currently how most football clubs see things and clearly it is discriminatory.

This particular example isn't just about getting a free ticket. It's about providing reasonable adjustments to people with autism under the Equality Act which are comparable to the adjustments made for disabled people to allow them to access football matches.

I have paid for 2 tickets in the past just so i can ensure the one next to me stays empty. I appreciate that at lots of grounds there is plenty of space and if i waited until after kick off i might get a seat in an empty area but this creates anxiety from the moment i wake in the morning as it's not planned and it is not guaranteed and is subject to change. Most people with autism plan everything down to the last detail to alleviate stress. Therefore i can't just rock up to the game on the day and decide ad hoc where i'm going to park / sit etc. It all has to be planned as any deviation can create distress.

Even allowing for the fact that i have an end seat and the seat next to me is empty. If i get a group of loutish lads directly behind me then i'd be spending the rest of the match scanning the stand to see where i can relocate to rather than relaxing and spending my energy enjoying the match and i can't rest until i've moved away from that situation. I can accept and cope with certain fans doing and shouting certain things but if it's a group of young lads who are prone to immaturity and acting erratically i cannot tolerate it. If it's a group of blokes who have had a few bevvies then the same applies. I have no control over the behaviour of the supporters around me and that's important. It's not important to be able to control them but to be able to be sat in an area from the start where i can relax and not clock every single fan who walks up near my seat to see if they are likely to be disruptive or not. That's tiring and i cannot usually relax until 10 minutes into a game where everything has settled down and the behaviour of the fans around me becomes predictable and unlikely to force me to move.

This is why i want a small section of stand set aside as a quiet area. Fans in wheelchairs have their own area because obviously they are in wheelchairs and their disability REQUIRES it. Fans with autism don't have their own areas despite their autism REQUIRING it. I don't see the difference.

My only other option is the family stand to virtually guarantee more sedate surroundings but i'd run the risk of looking like Rolf Harris sat in there on my own! No offence intended. Not good though. Not good at all.

Basically all i want from the footy is to be able to go, sit alone and in an area where the other fans around me aren't boisterous. This obviously proves difficult due to the very nature of football matches / crowds etc but these are criteria i require any football club to guarantee under the Equality Act 2010 due to my autism or at the very least make reasonable adjustments to try and accommodate my requirements.

Next time some of you go to the match you'll probably go through the entire day enjoying the pub, the matchday experience, the sandy pate bar, the laugh with mates and not even give a second thought to it all. It will just be just another cracking day out, unless the Stags lose obviously lol and you go home after and don't give it second thought.

Next time i go to the match i'll be sky high with anxiety from waking right through until getting home. I am barely able to do anything in that prolonged state let alone relax and enjoy a football match. Therefore if a lot of this anxiety is reduced due to me knowing in advance that i will be able to have my requirements (as above) met when i attend the footy then i can actually enjoy some of MY day out instead of simply focussing on what others are doing on THEIR day out.
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby sw19stag » Tue Jul 09, 2019 8:35 pm

Why do you like trains?
They must be your worst nightmare.
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby The One » Tue Jul 09, 2019 8:50 pm

Hands up . Who read all that
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby The92ForAutism » Tue Jul 09, 2019 9:28 pm

The One wrote:Hands up . Who read all that


Me
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby Iliketrains » Tue Jul 09, 2019 9:42 pm

sw19stag wrote:Why do you like trains?
They must be your worst nightmare.


I don't like trains but i do like Iliketrains who are a superb guitar band out of Leeds. They are non mainstream so you may not have heard of them. ;)
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby Iliketrains » Tue Jul 09, 2019 9:43 pm

The92ForAutism wrote:
The One wrote:Hands up . Who read all that


Me


:)

Fair play Ian. All this autism stuff is pretty heavy duty. :D
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby Iliketrains » Tue Jul 09, 2019 9:54 pm

The One wrote:Hands up . Who read all that


It's there for information purposes on an autism thread so obviously relevant. Whether you read it or not is ultimately of no consequence to me as clearly you aren't interested in autism and thus won't take anything positive from what i've posted or what Ian is doing re: his fundraising and awareness drive.

At the risk of me hijacking this thread with hefty posts and perhaps alienating people and thus hindering Ians cause, i will sign off by thanking all you open minded Stags fans out there who have read this thread and not judged and by encouraging everyone to keep an eye on Ians progress and donate.

I shall have my donation in on Thursday when i get paid next Ian. Only a few days of skintness to go for me! :lol: I wanted to wait as i wanted to give a bit more than just a random couple of quid. I'll visit the gofundme page on Thursday and make my donation.

I see you are starting your mammoth trek from Vale Park which ironically has to be my favourite away day as the place is massive for a league 2 ground. No need to be pre booking empty seats there. There are thousands of them! :D

Finally Ian i'm not sure if you will be keeping a record of what each club gives you to raffle off but i would be very interested to hear of any that don't donate anything at all. If any. I'm currently in the middle of writing a book (you'd never have guessed :roll: ) about my experiences of being a football fan with autism over the years and donating 10% of any sales to the National Autistic Society. If there ARE any sales that is. :D I'm trying to knock it out for Christmas so that there is viable literary alternative to Rylans life story :lol:

This kind of information would help me with my research but i will leave that totally up to you whether you want to come back on after the challenge and let us know how it went and which clubs were most / least helpful.
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby part time pete » Wed Jul 10, 2019 1:02 am

I actually read it ILT.

I have a lot of sympathy for you and presumably hundreds if not thousand of folk like yourself.

I would like to help you get to more games, but unsure how, perhaps you can pm me and give me suggestions. I generally go to every game and normally pass the ticket office most days so popping into office on your behalf would not be a problem in trying to sort out tickets for you.
Can we play Accrington Stanley every week.
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby Iliketrains » Wed Jul 10, 2019 9:52 am

Hey Pete.

Cheers for the offer mate. It's really great and kind that you want to help.

However.

It should be the football club that is helping me get to more games though and not you. It should be the football club taking suggestions about how they can make their club more accessible to autistic fans and not you and it should be the football club who should be making it easier for me to sort out tickets and not you.

They don't so i don't go much anymore.

Thanks anyway Pete. Appreciated.
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Re: “The 92 For Autism” Fundraising Event

Postby The92ForAutism » Wed Jul 10, 2019 7:07 pm

Iliketrains wrote:
The One wrote:Hands up . Who read all that


It's there for information purposes on an autism thread so obviously relevant. Whether you read it or not is ultimately of no consequence to me as clearly you aren't interested in autism and thus won't take anything positive from what i've posted or what Ian is doing re: his fundraising and awareness drive.

At the risk of me hijacking this thread with hefty posts and perhaps alienating people and thus hindering Ians cause, i will sign off by thanking all you open minded Stags fans out there who have read this thread and not judged and by encouraging everyone to keep an eye on Ians progress and donate.

I shall have my donation in on Thursday when i get paid next Ian. Only a few days of skintness to go for me! :lol: I wanted to wait as i wanted to give a bit more than just a random couple of quid. I'll visit the gofundme page on Thursday and make my donation.

I see you are starting your mammoth trek from Vale Park which ironically has to be my favourite away day as the place is massive for a league 2 ground. No need to be pre booking empty seats there. There are thousands of them! :D

Finally Ian i'm not sure if you will be keeping a record of what each club gives you to raffle off but i would be very interested to hear of any that don't donate anything at all. If any. I'm currently in the middle of writing a book (you'd never have guessed :roll: ) about my experiences of being a football fan with autism over the years and donating 10% of any sales to the National Autistic Society. If there ARE any sales that is. :D I'm trying to knock it out for Christmas so that there is viable literary alternative to Rylans life story :lol:

This kind of information would help me with my research but i will leave that totally up to you whether you want to come back on after the challenge and let us know how it went and which clubs were most / least helpful.


You’re welcome to hi-Jack this thread all you want mate, you’ve posted some excellent informative information on what it’s lije to attend a game as an adult on the spectrum and to me that cannot be ignored & if clubs can afford to they should look into properly getting a sensory room for ADULTS and children on the autistic spectrum.

I look forward to receiving your donation plus as mentioned on the original post it’s a minimum £5 donation to the donation page & for every £5 received that Stags fan will get the opportunity to win a voucher for x2 Stags matchday tickets, all proceeds to the organisations I am raising the money for ... Voucher kindly donated by the football club :)
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